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  • Writer's pictureFounder 100 Magazine

๐Ÿ๐ŸŽ๐Ÿ๐Ÿ‘ ๐Œ๐š๐ซ๐ค๐ฌ ๐ญ๐ก๐ž ๐‡๐จ๐ญ๐ญ๐ž๐ฌ๐ญ ๐˜๐ž๐š๐ซ ๐จ๐ง ๐‘๐ž๐œ๐จ๐ซ๐ ๐š๐ฌ ๐„๐š๐ซ๐ญ๐ก ๐๐ž๐š๐ซ๐ฌ ๐‚๐ซ๐ข๐ญ๐ข๐œ๐š๐ฅ ๐“๐ก๐ซ๐ž๐ฌ๐ก๐จ๐ฅ๐


๐Ÿ๐ŸŽ๐Ÿ๐Ÿ‘ ๐Œ๐š๐ซ๐ค๐ฌ ๐ญ๐ก๐ž ๐‡๐จ๐ญ๐ญ๐ž๐ฌ๐ญ ๐˜๐ž๐š๐ซ ๐จ๐ง ๐‘๐ž๐œ๐จ๐ซ๐ ๐š๐ฌ ๐„๐š๐ซ๐ญ๐ก ๐๐ž๐š๐ซ๐ฌ ๐‚๐ซ๐ข๐ญ๐ข๐œ๐š๐ฅ ๐“๐ก๐ซ๐ž๐ฌ๐ก๐จ๐ฅ๐



A year featuring extreme events across the globe is now officially Earth's hottest year on record, with the average temperature surpassing all previous records by a significant margin, according to reports from the Copernicus Climate Change Service (CCCS) and NOAA. The global average temperature for 2023 was 14.98 degrees Celsius (58.96 F), marking a substantial increase from the previous record set in 2016.


The data reveals that 2023 was 1.48 degrees Celsius (2.66 F) warmer than the 1850-1900 pre-industrial reference level, with nearly half of the days in 2023 surpassing the 1.5ยฐC warming limit. Furthermore, July and August were Earth's two warmest months on record, with the Northern Hemisphere's summer season also reaching new highs.


This increase in global temperatures has led to devastating heatwaves, floods, and wildfires, causing significant damage to lives and livelihoods across the world. The high temperatures were primarily driven by continued record emissions of carbon dioxide, and it is emphasized that some extreme weather events, such as heatwaves in Europe and the US, would have been nearly impossible without human-caused global heating.


Experts warn that these unprecedented climate conditions have profound consequences for human endeavors and the need to urgently decarbonize the economy while using climate data and knowledge to prepare for the future. The severity of these events calls for a rapid reduction in fossil fuel burning to preserve livable conditions for humanity.


As Earth approaches the critical threshold of 1.5 degrees Celsius, there is a pressing need for a collective effort to address the ongoing climate crisis and ensure the sustainability of the planet for future generations.


The recent COP28 climate agreement emphasized the gradual transition away from fossil fuels as the main cause of climate warming. The findings from the Copernicus Climate Change Service serve as a stark reminder of the urgent action needed to mitigate the impacts of climate change and safeguard the well-being of the planet.

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